Dr. Ron’s Research Review – November 10, 2010

This week’s research review contains articles on 3beta-Adiol; and Testosterone – Estrogen and CAD.

3beta-Adiol

There are several resources for information on 3beta-Adiol

A research summary on 3beta-Adiol (link) and abstracts for articles can be found on Dr. Wright’s research page. (link)

The metabolism and nomenclature are tricky. The full name of 3beta-Adiol is 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol. Both 3alpha and 3beta Adiol are formed from 5alpha-DHT.

3beta-Adiol is formed from 5alpha-DHT by 3alpha-HSD in a bi-directional reaction. It may be a storage form.

3alpha-Adiol (the “good” one) can be formed by a combination of 3alpha and 3beta HSD, or 17beta-HSD type 7.

Note that 5alpha-reductase (5AR) works on the first part of the molecule (5alpha), while 3alpha and 3beta-HSD works on the middle part of the molecule (3beta) to form 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol.

Testosterone – Estrogen and CAD

Testosterone supplementation has been linked to a reduced risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) specifically in men. In animal models the reduced risk of CAD in males administrated with testosterone is due to the conversion of testosterone into estrogen; and sex hormone ratio changes rather than each individual sex hormone were found to be the predictor of CAD in a human study, suggesting the importance of a proper ratio of estrogen:testosterone in the development of CAD. (Yang, Wang et al. 2010)

Dr. Ron


Articles

Prevention of coronary artery disease in men: Male hormone, female hormone, or both?

            (Yang, Wang et al. 2010) Download

Sex hormones play an important role in coronary artery disease. Although both male and female hormones have been well-documented to be able to influence vascular biology, the preventive use of sex hormones in CAD is not established. Recent progress suggests a necessity of rethinking of the use of sex hormones for CAD in both sexes. We hypothesize that a long-term and appropriate low-dose combination of male hormone and female hormone could be an effective preventive strategy for men with a high risk of but not developed CAD. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that estrogen has favorable profiles on several key CAD-associated risk factors regardless of sexes. Testosterone supplementation has been linked to a reduced risk of CAD specifically in men. In animal models the reduced risk of CAD in males administrated with testosterone is due to the conversion of testosterone into estrogen; and sex hormone ratio changes rather than each individual sex hormone were found to be the predictor of CAD in a human study, suggesting the importance of a proper ratio of estrogen:testosterone in the development of CAD. In addition, the controversy surrounding the use of hormone replacement therapy in women in turn indicates a potential beneficial effect of sex hormones in men in the prevention of CAD because of the fundamental difference between sexes. Therefore, the combined use of estrogen and testosterone for CAD in men deserves a full investigation and could provide useful information in understanding of the preventive and/or therapeutic application of sex hormones in both sexes.

References

Yang, C., X. Wang, et al. (2010). "Prevention of coronary artery disease in men: Male hormone, female hormone, or both?" Med Hypotheses.