Dr. Ron’s Research Review – May 5, 2011

This week’s research review focuses on B vitamins for PMS, and an article on the changes in digestion that occur with aging.

Dietary B vitamin intake and incident premenstrual syndrome

            (Chocano-Bedoya, Manson et al. 2011)

Is stomach spontaneously ageing? Pathophysiology of the ageing stomach

            (Salles 2009)

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Dr. Ron


Articles

Dietary B vitamin intake and incident premenstrual syndrome

            (Chocano-Bedoya, Manson et al. 2011) Download

BACKGROUND: Thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, and vitamin B-12 are required to synthesize neurotransmitters that are potentially involved in the pathophysiology of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate whether B vitamin intake from food sources and supplements is associated with the initial development of PMS. DESIGN: We conducted a case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. Participants were free of PMS at baseline (1991). After 10 y of follow up, 1057 women were confirmed as cases and 1968 were confirmed as controls. Dietary information was collected in 1991, 1995, and 1999 by using food-frequency questionnaires. RESULTS: Intakes of thiamine and riboflavin from food sources were each inversely associated with incident PMS. For example, women in the highest quintile of riboflavin intake 2-4 y before the diagnosis year had a 35% lower risk of developing PMS than did those in the lowest quintile (relative risk: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.92; P for trend = 0.02). No significant associations between incident PMS and dietary intakes of niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, and vitamin B-12 were observed. Intake of B vitamins from supplements was not associated with a lower risk of PMS. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a significantly lower risk of PMS in women with high intakes of thiamine and riboflavin from food sources only. Further research is needed to evaluate the effects of B vitamins in the development of premenstrual syndrome.

Is stomach spontaneously ageing? Pathophysiology of the ageing stomach

            (Salles 2009) Download

During ageing, histological and physiological modifications occur in the stomach leading to a confirmed state of gastric frailty defined by a decreased capacity of tissue repairing after mucosa gastric aggression. The process of intrinsic gastric ageing may play a role in inducing abnormalities of gastric epithelial proliferation against injury but, most of the time, pathophysiological modifications observed in older people are the consequences of chronic insults, such as chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, polymedication, especially Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAID), and co morbidities. One of the major clinical consequences of the gastric frailty is the higher vulnerability to the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease during ageing. In this review recent data on gastric changes during ageing, focussing especially on histological modifications and motility disorders are summarized.

References

Chocano-Bedoya, P. O., J. E. Manson, et al. (2011). "Dietary B vitamin intake and incident premenstrual syndrome." Am J Clin Nutr.

Salles, N. (2009). "Is stomach spontaneously ageing? Pathophysiology of the ageing stomach." Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 23(6): 805-19.