Dr. Ron’s Research Review – May 1, 2013

© 2013

This week’s research review focuses on Glycine and Gout

Several studies in the 1920s showed that the ingestion of glycine by a fasting man is followed by an increased hourly excretion of uric acid. This effect is noted during the 1st hour after the ingestion of the glycine and continues for the following 2 hours. (Christman and Mosier 1929)

Friedman showed that glycine does not increase the production of uric acid in the body of either rat or man. On the other hand it was certain from the observations made that glycine ingestion does increase the renal excretion of uric acid. The failure of the blood uric acid to decrease in the presence of this increased renal output of uric acid may well be due to the ability of the extra-vascular tissues to maintain the blood uric acid concentration despite its increased renal excretion. (Friedman 1947)

The use of glycine and salicylate in the treatment of gout was fairly well established in the 1950s. It was discontinued on the belief that the administration of glycine may actually promote the formation of uric acid. (Wrigley 1950)

A more recent study showed that glycine increased the renal clearance of uric acid in gouty subjects. A single oral dose of glycine, 100 mg/kg body weight, a "physiologic" load, was given to ten normal men and seventeen patients with primary gout. The ensuing uricosuria, chiefly due to increased renal clearance of uric acid, was relatively greater in the gouty subjects. (Yu, Kaung et al. 1970)

Dr. Ron


Articles

The Effect Of The Ingestion Of Glycine On The Excretion Of Endogenous Uric Acid

         (Christman and Mosier 1929) Download

After the collection of two control samples, 10 gm. of glycine were ingested and the hourly collection continued for the following 5 hours.

Our results then are in accordance with the work of Lewis, Dunn, and Doisy; that is, the ingestion of glycine produces a distinct rise in the uric acid excretion.

In confirmation of the work of Lewis, Dunn, and Doisy (2) these results show that the ingestion of glycine by a fasting man is followed by an increased hourly excretion of uric acid. This effect is noted during the 1st hour after the ingestion of the glycine and continues for the following 2 hours.

The Effect of Glycine on the Production and Excretion of Uric Acid

         (Friedman 1947) Download

The above results suggest quite strongly that glycine does not increase the production of uric acid in the body of either rat or man. On the other hand it was certain from the observations made that glycine ingestion does increase the renal excretion of uric acid.

The failure of the blood uric acid to decrease in the presence of this increased renal output of uric acid may well be due to the ability of the extra- vascular tissues to maintain the blood uric acid concentration despite its increased renal excretion.

Glycine in the Treatment of Gout

         (Wrigley 1950) Download

The use of glycine and salicylate in the treatment of gout has now become fairly well established. This paper is to suggest a reconsideration of this form of therapy.

One might think there is not in these studies sufficient evidence to justify the administration of glycine to a case of gout. Later evidence points to the fact that the administration of glycine may actually promote the formation of uric acid.

Effect of glycine loading on plasma and urinary uric acid and amino acids in normal and gouty subjects

         (Yu, Kaung et al. 1970) Download

A single oral dose of glycine, 100 mg/kg body weight, a "physiologic" load, was given to ten normal men and seventeen patients with primary gout. The ensuing uricosuria, chiefly due to increased renal clearance of uric acid, was relatively greater in the gouty subjects.


References

Christman, A. A. and E. C. Mosier (1929). "The Effect Of The Ingestion Of Glycine On The Excretion Of Endogenous Uric Acid." J. Biol. Chem. 83: 11-19. [PMID:

Friedman, M. (1947). "The Effect of Glycine on the Production and Excretion of Uric Acid." J Clin Invest 26(4): 815-9. [PMID: 16695473]

Wrigley, F. (1950). "Glycine in the Treatment of Gout." Ann Rheum Dis 9(1): 38-42. [PMID: 18623833]

Yu, T. F., C. Kaung, et al. (1970). "Effect of glycine loading on plasma and urinary uric acid and amino acids in normal and gouty subjects." Am J Med 49(3): 352-9. [PMID: 5455567]