Dr. Ron’s Research Review – October 22, 2014

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This week’s research review focuses on Thrombophlebitis, allergies and gluten..

Allergies

Ten randomly selected patients with recurrent non-traumatic thrombophlebitis of unknown etiology were studied using a comprehensive environmental control method. All cleared their phlebitis without medications. Using withdrawal and challenge of incitants, eight of 10 patients had their phlebitis reproduced. The numerous single triggering agents were common-place inhaled and ingested foods and chemicals. (Rea, 1976)
Twenty disabled patients with recurrent intractable non-traumatic phlebitis were studied. The control group was continued on their standard anticoagulant regime, bed rest and support hose. The other group was placed in an especially designed Environmental Control Unit (ECU) and taken off all medication and not fed until the leg pain and swelling disappeared, which was four to seven days. The patients then showed specific sensitivities to foods and ambient sub-threshold doses of inhaled chemicals such as formaldehyde, phenol, chlorine, petroleum alcohol and pesticide (2,4 DNP) under controlled double-blind challenges. Eight out of 10 patients had their phlebitis reproduced in this manner. When in the symptom-free state, these patients were required to ride an exercycle at 150 kpm for one mile daily to demonstrate absence of phlebitis (none could walk across the room prior to examination). The five-year follow-up in the group showed two 48-hour episodes of phlebitis cleared by home bed rest and food abstenance. In contrast, the control group had more than 60 episodes of phlebitis at home and 41 episodes in the hospital. Medical costs in these comparable groups showed a differential of $20 per patient in the Environmental Control Unit treatment versus more than $20,000 per patient in the control group over the five-year follow-up. (Rea et al., 1981)

Gluten

A case report describes a patient with sarcoidosis with recurrent thrombophlebitis and idiopathic steatorrhoea that responded to a gluten-free diet with B12 and folate. (Smith, 1966)

Dr. Ron


Articles

Environmentally triggered thrombophlebitis.
(Rea, 1976) Download
Ten randomly selected patients with recurrent non-traumatic thrombophlebitis of unknown etiology were studied using a comprehensive environmental control method. All cleared their phlebitis without medications. Using withdrawal and challenge of incitants, eight of 10 patients had their phlebitis reproduced. The numerous single triggering agents were common-place inhaled and ingested foods and chemicals.

Recurrent environmentally triggered thrombophlebitis: a five-year follow-up.
(Rea et al., 1981) Download
Twenty disabled patients with recurrent intractable nontraumatic phlebitis were studied. The patients were divided into two groups and matched for age and severity. The control group was continued on their standard anticoagulant regime, bed rest and support hose. The other group was placed in an especially designed Environmental Control Unit (ECU) where all air, food and water could be controlled. These patients were taken off all medication and not fed until the leg pain and swelling disappeared, which was four to seven days. The patients then showed specific sensitivities to foods and ambient subthreshold doses of inhaled chemicals such as formaldehyde less than 0.2 ppm, phenol less than 0.0024 ppm, chlorine less than 0.33 ppm, petroleum alcohol less than 0.5 ppm and pesticide (2,4 DNP) less than 0.0134 ppm under controlled double-blind challenges. Eight out of 10 patients had their phlebitis reproduced in this manner. When in the symptom-free state, these patients were required to ride an exercycle at 150 kpm for one mile daily to demonstrate absence of phlebitis (none could walk across the room prior to examination). The five-year follow-up in the group showed two 48-hour episodes of phlebitis cleared by home bed rest and food abstenance. In contrast, the control group had more than 60 episodes of phlebitis at home and 41 episodes in the hospital. Medical costs in these comparable groups showed a differential of $20 per patient in the Environmental Control Unit treatment versus more than $20,000 per patient in the control group over the five-year follow-up.

Sarcoidosis with recurrent thrombophlebitis and idiopathic steatorrhoea.
(Smith, 1966) Download


 

References

Rea, WJ (1976), ‘Environmentally triggered thrombophlebitis.’, Ann Allergy, 37 (2), 101-9. PubMedID: 970676
Rea, WJ, et al. (1981), ‘Recurrent environmentally triggered thrombophlebitis: a five-year follow-up.’, Ann Allergy, 47 (5 Pt 1), 338-44. PubMedID: 7316249
Smith, BD (1966), ‘Sarcoidosis with recurrent thrombophlebitis and idiopathic steatorrhoea.’, Proc R Soc Med, 59 (6), 569-70. PubMedID: 5937945