Dr. Ron’s Research Review – September 10, 2014

© 2014

This week’s research review focuses on Ginger (Zingiber officinale) for migraine attacks

In a double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 100 patients who had acute migraine without aura were randomly allocated to receive either ginger powder (250 mg) or sumatriptan (50 mg). Both sumatriptan  and ginger decrease the mean severity of common migraine attacks within two hours of use.  No significant difference existed between the two treatments.  
There was 4.7 unit reduction in the headache severity in the sumatriptan group and a 4.6 reduction in the ginger group.
Favorable relief was achieved in 70% of the sumatriptan-treated headache individuals and 64% of the ginger-treated patients at two hours following intake.
There were more side effects from sumatriptan use, including dizziness, sedation, vertigo and heartburn. The only clinical adverse effect of ginger was dyspepsia.

The effectiveness of ginger powder in the treatment of common migraine attacks is statistically comparable to sumatriptan. Ginger also poses a better side effect profile than sumatriptan. (Maghbooli et al., 2014)

Dr. Ron
 


Articles

 

Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine.
         (Maghbooli et al., 2014) Download
Frequency and torment caused by migraines direct patients toward a variety of remedies. Few studies to date have proposed ginger derivates for migraine relief. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of ginger in the ablation of common migraine attack in comparison to sumatriptan therapy. In this double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 100 patients who had acute migraine without aura were randomly allocated to receive either ginger powder or sumatriptan. Time of headache onset, its severity, time interval from headache beginning to taking drug and patient self-estimation about response for five subsequent migraine attacks were recorded by patients. Patients(,) satisfaction from treatment efficacy and their willingness to continue it was also evaluated after 1 month following intervention. Two hours after using either drug, mean headaches severity decreased significantly. Efficacy of ginger powder and sumatriptan was similar. Clinical adverse effects of ginger powder were less than sumatriptan. Patients' satisfaction and willingness to continue did not differ. The effectiveness of ginger powder in the treatment of common migraine attacks is statistically comparable to sumatriptan. Ginger also poses a better side effect profile than sumatriptan.

References

Maghbooli, M, et al. (2014), ‘Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine.’, Phytother Res, 28 (3), 412-15. PubMedID: 23657930