Dr. Ron’s Research Review – August 5, 2015

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This week’s research review focuses on lab tests for the Well Man exam.

An article published in American Family Physician recommends the following labs for an adult well male examination. (Heidelbaugh and Tortorello, 2012)
Fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1C are recommended if BP > 135/80 mm Hg
Total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides are recommended for men age > 35 years and for men 20 to 34 years of age with cardiovascular risk factors.
Colorectal cancer screening with fecal occult blood is recommended for men age 50 to 75.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has provisionally recommended against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer because the harms of testing and overtreatment outweigh potential benefits. (Heidelbaugh and Tortorello, 2012)

 

Dr. Ron


 

Articles

The adult well male examination
            (Heidelbaugh and Tortorello, 2012) Download
The adult well male examination should incorporate evidence-based guidance toward the promotion of optimal health and well-being, including screening tests shown to improve health outcomes. Nearly one-third of men report not having a primary care physician. The medical history should include substance use; risk factors for sexually transmitted infections; diet and exercise habits; and symptoms of depression. Physical examination should include blood pressure and body mass index screening. Men with sustained blood pressures greater than 135/80 mm Hg should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Lipid screening is warranted in all men 35 years and older, and in men 20 to 34 years of age who have cardiovascular risk factors. Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm should occur between 65 and 75 years of age in men who have ever smoked. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening men for osteoporosis or skin cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has provisionally recommended against prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer because the harms of testing and overtreatment outweigh potential benefits. Screening for colorectal cancer should begin at 50 years of age in men of average risk and continue until at least 75 years of age. Screening should be performed by high-sensitivity fecal occult blood testing every year, flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years combined with [corrected] fecal occult blood testing every three years. [corrected]. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against screening for testicular cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Immunizations should be recommended according to guidelines from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

References

Heidelbaugh, J. J. and M. Tortorello (2012), ‘The adult well male examination’, Am Fam Physician, 85 (10), 964-71. PubMedID: 22612046