Dr. Ron’s Research Review – June 24, 2015

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This week’s research review focuses on vitamin B1 for bleeding and spotting with IUDs.

Excessive menstrual bleeding, the most common complication caused by intrauterine devices (IUDs), often leads to discontinuation of use.
A double-blind, randomized controlled trial involved 110 Iranian women that were followed for four months. The intervention group and the control group received 100 mg of vitamin B1 or a placebo, respectively, daily, for three months. The Higham scale was used for estimating the volume of menstrual bleeding.  In the intervention group the duration of menstrual bleeding, the number of sanitary pads and the amount of spotting decreased significantly compared to the control group (p < 0.001). (Jafari et al., 2014)

An earlier study published in the Indian Journal of Medical Research used oral vitamin B1 administration for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. (Gokhale, 1996)
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out on 556 girls aged 12-21 years, having moderate to very severe spasmodic dysmenorrhoea. Thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1, 100 mg orally, daily for 90 days) resulted in 87 per cent completely cured, 8 per cent relieved (pain almost nil to reduced) and 5 per cent showed no effect whatsoever.

 

Dr. Ron


 

Articles

Curative treatment of primary (spasmodic) dysmenorrhea
            (Gokhale, 1996) Download
To prove the efficacy of oral vitamin B1 administration for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea, a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out on 556 girls aged 12-21 yr, having moderate to very severe spasmodic dysmenorrhoea. Thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1) was given in a dose of 100 mg orally, daily for 90 days. The combined final results of both the 'active treatment first' group and the 'placebo first' group, after 90 days of vitamin B1 administration, were 87 per cent completely cured, 8 per cent relieved (pain almost nil to reduced) and 5 per cent showed no effect whatsoever. The results remained the same two months later as well when no drug was administered. Unlike all the current treatments which are suppression-oriented, this curative treatment directly treats the cause, is free from side effects, is inexpensive and easy to administer.

The effect of vitamin B1 on bleeding and spotting in women using an intrauterine device: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.
            (Jafari et al., 2014) Download
OBJECTIVES: Excessive menstrual bleeding, the most common complication caused by intrauterine devices (IUDs), often leads to discontinuation of use. Our study investigates the effect of vitamin B1 on menstrual bleeding and spotting after insertion of the TCu380A IUD. METHODS: This double-blind, randomised controlled trial involved 110 Iranian women. We recruited women who noted that their menstrual flow (duration, amount, and number of sanitary pads needed) or intermenstrual spotting had increased one month after the insertion of a TCu380A, and randomly assigned them to two groups. The intervention group and the control group received 100 mg of vitamin B1 or a placebo, respectively, daily, for three months. We followed all participants for four months. The Higham scale was used for estimating the volume of menstrual bleeding. The Mann-Whitney test, paired t-test, independent t-test and Repeated Measure test were used for statistical purposes. RESULTS: In the intervention group the duration of menstrual bleeding, the number of sanitary pads and the amount of spotting decreased significantly compared to the control group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Vitamin B1 is a safe, natural and cost-effective supplement that is devoid of side effects and reduces menstrual bleeding and spotting caused by a copper bearing-IUD.


 

References

Gokhale, L. B. (1996), ‘Curative treatment of primary (spasmodic) dysmenorrhoea’, Indian J Med Res, 103 227-31. PubMedID: 8935744
Jafari, A, et al. (2014), ‘The effect of vitamin B1 on bleeding and spotting in women using an intrauterine device: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.’, Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care, 19 (3), 180-86. PubMedID: 24738933