Dr. Ron’s Research Review – July 13, 2016

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This week’s research review focuses on migraine therapy by Dr. Dzugan.

Migraine is not a single disorder, but a collection including the following:
Malfunction in a different place of the hypothalamus-pituitary-steroid hormonal chain with a disruption of normal function of multiple feed back loop mechanism;
An imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, and as a result, decreased pain threshold of brain nociceptive system;
Lack of equilibrium between calcium and magnesium ions inside and outside of cells, leading to changed electricity of the cell membrane, and a changed condition of calcium channels;
Low production of melatonin or decreased sensitivity of the cell membrane to melatonin;
Altered intestinal flora with abnormal gastrointestinal absorption.
A study evaluated 30 patients ages 16-66 with migraine who were treated with a multimodal treatment program. All patients were placed on a multimodal program that includes the following approaches:
Hormonorestorative therapy (HT) with bio-identical hormones, which includes a combination of: oral pregnenolone, DHEA, and triestrogen, progesterone, and testosterone gels; Correction of the balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic systems and simultaneously calcium/magnesium balance; “Resetting” the pineal gland (with melatonin to normalize the circadian cycle;
Improve intestinal absorption through restoration of normal intestinal flora;
A cleanse from parasites infestation (if necessary).
All patients responded to this regimen. Laboratory finding prior to HT showed the significant deficiency in production of all basic steroid hormones (progesterone and pregnenolone declined the most). Concurrent symptoms such as fibromyalgia, insomnia, depression, gastrointestinal disorders, and fatigue had disappeared. Total cholesterol completely normalized in 22 (91.7%) patients. No adverse effects or complications related to this program were registered.

Dr. Ron


 

Articles

Is migraine a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity? A new hypothesis.
            (Dzugan and Dzugan, 2015) Download
OBJECTIVE:  In 2002 we suggested a new hypothesis of migraine. This hypothesis implies that migraine is a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity. The goal of this clinical analysis is to present the evaluation of the effect of a multimodal treatment program in migraine management. MATERIAL AND METHODS:  We evaluated 30 patients ages 16-66 with migraine who were treated with a multimodal treatment program. All patients received a complex program which included: hormonorestorative therapy (HT) with bio-identical hormones; correction of balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic systems and simultaneously calcium/magnesium balance; "resetting" the pineal gland; improvement of intestinal absorption through restoration of normal intestinal flora, and a cleanse from parasitic infestation (if necessary). Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), progesterone, total estrogen, and total testosterone were determined, RESULTS:  All patients responded to this regimen. We do not have patients who still have migraine after they started to use this program. Laboratory finding prior to HT showed the significant deficiency in production of all basic steroid hormones (progesterone and pregnenolone production declined the most). Concurrent symptoms such as fibromyalgia, insomnia, depression, gastrointestinal disorders, and fatigue had disappeared. Total cholesterol completely normalized in 22 (91.7%) patients. No adverse effects or complications related to this program were registered. CONCLUSIONS:  Our findings support the hypothesis that migraine is a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity, and that migraine can be managed by a multimodal approach.

References

Dzugan, SA and KS Dzugan (2015), ‘Is migraine a consequence of a loss of neurohormonal and metabolic integrity? A new hypothesis.’, Neuro Endocrinol Lett, 36 (5), 421-29. PubMed: 26707041