Dr. Ron’s Research Review – March 29, 2017

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This week’s research review focuses on Myrle Versus Omeprazol in GERD.

 

Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) was compared with omeprazol for reflux disease in a 6-week double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-five participants were assigned randomly to 3 groups as A (myrtle berries freeze-dried aqueous extract, 1000 mg/d), B (omeprazol capsules, 20 mg/d), and C (A and B). (Zohalinezhad et al., 2016)
The assessment at the beginning and the end of the study was done by using a standardized questionnaire of frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG). In all groups, both reflux and dyspeptic scores significantly decreased in comparison with the respective baselines. Concerning each group, significant changes were found in FSSG, dysmotility-like symptoms and acid reflux related scores. No significant differences were observed between all groups in final FSSG total scores (FSSG2).

Myrtle was found to be as effective as omeprazol at the end of the study.

 

Dr. Ron

 


Articles

 

Myrtus communis L. Freeze-Dried Aqueous Extract Versus Omeprazol in Gastrointestinal Reflux Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.
            (Zohalinezhad et al., 2016) Download
The current work assessed a pharmaceutical dosage form of Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) in reflux disease compared with omeprazol via a 6-week double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-five participants were assigned randomly to 3 groups as A (myrtle berries freeze-dried aqueous extract, 1000 mg/d), B (omeprazol capsules, 20 mg/d), and C (A and B). The assessment at the beginning and the end of the study was done by using a standardized questionnaire of frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG). In all groups, both reflux and dyspeptic scores significantly decreased in comparison with the respective baselines. Concerning each group, significant changes were found in FSSG, dysmotility-like symptoms and acid reflux related scores. No significant differences were observed between all groups in final FSSG total scores (FSSG2). Further studies with more precise design and larger sample size may lead to a better outcome to suggest the preparation as an alternative intervention.

 

References

Zohalinezhad, ME, et al. (2016), ‘Myrtus communis L. Freeze-Dried Aqueous Extract Versus Omeprazol in Gastrointestinal Reflux Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.’, J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med, 21 (1), 23-29. PubMed: 26045552