Dr. Ron’s Research Review – August 15, 2018

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This week’s research review focuses on photographic art lowers blood pressure.

A study determined if carefully selected photographic art could counter the anxiety that causes white coat hypertension and lead to lower BP recordings in some patients.  117 adults, non-pregnant patients from the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Family Medicine Resident Clinic participated in this study. After the triage nurse measured the BP, the patients were randomly placed in either an exam room with standard medical posters (control room) or in an exam room with photographic art (photo room). The BP was measured in the exam room. After the medical visit, the patients switched rooms and the BP was measured a third time. The patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire to identify room preference. (Harper et al., 2015)
On average, the BP obtained in the control rooms was higher than that obtained in the photo rooms. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean arterial pressure, systolic BP and diastolic BP between the control room and the photo room.
The following table shows the BP difference between the control and photo rooms, median, mean±SD, range, and p Value.

 

Median

Mean

Range

p

MAP

2.0

1.0±5.8

−32.5 to 12.0

0.004**

Systolic BP 2.0

2.0

1.2±8.5

−28 to 26

0.02*

Diastolic BP

2.0

0.7±7.0

−40 to 20

0.03*

Landscape photographic art may have the beneficial effect of reducing BP in medical office examination rooms.

Dr. Ron

 


 

Articles

Photographic art in exam rooms may reduce white coat hypertension.
            (Harper et al., 2015) Download
INTRODUCTION:  Blood pressure (BP) elevation in medical office settings in patients who are normotensive in nonmedical settings is an effect known as 'white coat hypertension'. This phenomenon is thought to be due to situational anxiety caused by the experience of visiting a doctor and the anxiety-inducing nature of the medical office. Our study was designed to determine if carefully selected photographic art could counter the anxiety that causes white coat hypertension and lead to lower BP recordings in some patients. METHODS:  117 adults, non-pregnant patients from the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Family Medicine Resident Clinic participated in this study. After the triage nurse measured the BP, the patients were randomly placed in either an exam room with standard medical posters (control room) or in an exam room with photographic art (photo room). The BP was measured in the exam room. After the medical visit, the patients switched rooms and the BP was measured a third time. The patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire to identify room preference. RESULTS:  On average, the BP obtained in the control rooms was higher than that obtained in the photo rooms. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean arterial pressure, systolic BP and diastolic BP between the control room and the photo room. CONCLUSIONS:  Landscape photographic art may have the beneficial effect of reducing BP in medical office examination rooms.

References

 

Harper, MB, et al. (2015), ‘Photographic art in exam rooms may reduce white coat hypertension.’, Med Humanit, 41 (2), 86-88. PubMed: 25861793