Dr. Ron’s Research Review – September 19, 2018

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This week’s research review focuses on metabolic syndrome in horses.

Horses metabolic disorders have become an important problem of modern veterinary medicine. Pathological obesity, insulin resistance and predisposition toward laminitis are associated with Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS). Apart from obesity, two other factors i.e. hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance (IR), play a key role in its development.  (Marycz et al., 2018)
More and more frequent, EMS is highly connected with improper feeding strategy and individual predispositions.
High levels of circulating glucose from digested non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), stimulates pancreas to secrete robust amount of insulin leading in consequence to the development of IR and/or laminitis. Thus reducing NSC levels in horse’ diet helps to maintain energy balance.
Most researchers recommend forage diet for obese and EMS horses, with proper mineral and vitamins qualified concentration. It is recommended to feed EMS horses with vitamin E, vitamin A, copper, zinc and selenium, because mature grass hay is the main source of these mentioned above components.
The author’s research indicate that horses fed with a diet based on Spirulina platensis supplementation lost weight and improved insulin sensitivity.
The paper proposes biomass of algae enriched with Cr(III) and Mn (II) as a preparation for feeding Equine Metabolic Syndrome horses. Chromium absorption is low, ranging between 0.4 and 2.0% for inorganic compounds while the availability of organic Cr is more than 10 times higher.
Manganese (Mn) is an essential element that is involved in the synthesis and activation of many enzymes and in the regulation of the metabolism of glucose and lipids in humans. (Li and Yang, 2018)

The authors present a combined kind of therapy- an innovative and cutting edge approach of metabolic disorders treatment may become a new gold standard in personalized veterinary medicine.

 

Dr. Ron


 

Articles

Advanced nutritional and stem cells approaches to prevent equine metabolic syndrome.
            (Marycz et al., 2018) Download
Horses metabolic disorders have become an important problem of modern veterinary medicine. Pathological obesity, insulin resistance and predisposition toward laminitis are associated with Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS). Based on pathogenesis of EMS, dietary and cell therapy management may significantly reduce development of this disorder. Special attention has been paid to the diet supplementation with highly bioavailable minerals and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) which increase insulin sensitivity. In nutrition, there is a great interests in natural algae enriched via biosorption process with micro- and macroelements. In the case of cellular therapy, metabolic condition of engrafted cells may be crucial for the effectiveness of the therapy. Although, recent studies indicated on MSC deterioration in EMS individuals. Here, we described the combined nutritional and stem cells therapy for the EMS treatment. Moreover, we specified in details how EMS affects the adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) population. Presented here, combined kind of therapy- an innovative and cutting edge approach of metabolic disorders treatment may become a new gold standard in personalized veterinary medicine.

The Essential Element Manganese, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Diseases: Links and Interactions.
            (Li and Yang, 2018) Download
Manganese (Mn) is an essential element that is involved in the synthesis and activation of many enzymes and in the regulation of the metabolism of glucose and lipids in humans. In addition, Mn is one of the required components for Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) that is mainly responsible for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondrial oxidative stress. Both Mn deficiency and intoxication are associated with adverse metabolic and neuropsychiatric effects. Over the past few decades, the prevalence of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2MD), obesity, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and hepatic steatosis, has increased dramatically. Previous studies have found that ROS generation, oxidative stress, and inflammation are critical for the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In addition, deficiency in dietary Mn as well as excessive Mn exposure could increase ROS generation and result in further oxidative stress. However, the relationship between Mn and metabolic diseases is not clear. In this review, we provide insights into the role Mn plays in the prevention and development of metabolic diseases.


 

References

Li, L and X Yang (2018), ‘The Essential Element Manganese, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Diseases: Links and Interactions.’, Oxid Med Cell Longev, 2018 7580707. PubMed: 29849912
Marycz, K, I Michalak, and K Kornicka (2018), ‘Advanced nutritional and stem cells approaches to prevent equine metabolic syndrome.’, Res Vet Sci, 118 115-25. PubMed: 29421480