Dr. Ron’s Research Review – March 20, 2019

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This week’s research review focuses on Tamarindus indicus, Melia azadirach and Santalum album for vaginitis.

 

At least 25 % of women attending genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics receive treatment for one of the three common causes of abnormal vaginal discharge: bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis and trichomoniasis. Syndromic diagnostic approach was adopted by National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) India, at the primary health center level. Syndromic management implies the simultaneous treatment of two or more infections.
A randomized, single blind, standard controlled trial compared the efficacy of Tamarindus indicus (Tamarind), Melia azadirach and Santalum album  (Indian sandalwood) in syndromic management of Sailanur rehm (pathological discharge) against combination of azithromycin, fluconazole and secnidazole on diagnosed subjects of Sailanur rehm. Test group received 10 g of test drug B.D for 21 days while control group received single dose of standard drug to both the partners.  (Bhat and Begum, 2017)
Vaginal symptom score (VSS) was used for assessing discharge and associated complaints. Visual analogous scale (VAS) was used for assessing low backache and lower abdominal pain.
There were no significant differences between the two groups concerning baseline characteristics (p>0.05). VSS was significantly decreased with p<0.001 for both control and test group. VAS was significantly decreased with p<0.001 and p=0.07 in test and control group respectively for low backache. For lower abdominal pain p=0.006 for both groups after the completion of treatment.
The formulation can effectively alleviate the disease with associated symptoms without any side effects. It can be used in syndromic management of vaginal discharge.

Dr. Ron

 


Articles

 

Efficacy of Tamarindus indicus, Melia azadirach and Santalum album in syndromic management of abnormal vaginal discharge: A single-blind randomised controlled trial.
            (Bhat and Begum, 2017) Download
Background At least 25 % of women attending genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics receive treatment for one of the three common causes of abnormal vaginal discharge: bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis and trichomoniasis. Syndromic diagnostic approach was adopted by National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) India, at the primary health centre level. Syndromic management implies the simultaneous treatment of two or more infections. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of sandal sufaid, maghze tukhme bakayin and khaste tamar hindi in syndromic management of Sailanur rehm. Methods This study was a randomized, single blind, standard controlled trial. It was conducted to compare efficacy of formulation which contains buradae sandal safaid, safoofe maghze tukhme bakayin, safoofe khaste tamar hindi and safoofe shakkar safaid against combination of azithromycin, fluconazole and secnidazole on diagnosed subjects of Sailanur rehm. Test group received 10 g of test drug B.D for 21 days while control group received single dose of standard drug to both the partners. Vaginal symptom score (VSS) was used for assessing discharge and associated complaints. Visual analogous scale (VAS) was used for assessing low backache and lower abdominal pain. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups concerning baseline characteristics (p>0.05). VSS was significantly decreased with p<0.001 for both control and test group. VAS was significantly decreased with p<0.001 and p=0.07 in test and control group respectively for low backache. For lower abdominal pain p=0.006 for both groups after the completion of treatment. Conclusions The formulation can effectively alleviate the disease with associated symptoms without any side effects. It can be used in syndromic management of vaginal discharge. Future research is on large sample size.

References

Bhat, TA and W Begum (2017), ‘Efficacy of Tamarindus indicus, Melia azadirach and Santalum album in syndromic management of abnormal vaginal discharge: A single-blind randomised controlled trial.’, J Complement Integr Med, 15 (2), PubMed: 29257757