Dr. Ron’s Research Review – November 20, 2019

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This week’s research review focuses on pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) for weight loss.

Leung proposes that supplementation of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) would facilitate complete catabolism of fatty acids and thus the formation of ketone bodies could be circumvented. As a result, a sufficient amount of energy would be released from storage fat to relieve dieters of the sensation of hunger and weakness which otherwise would be difficult to endure. Hence, using this method for weight reduction together with a careful observation of calorie intake, he has great success in treating overweight-to-obese patients to lose weight.  Dieters were given orally 2.5 g of pantothenic acid 4 times a day. (Leung, 1995)

Leung also hypothesized that the pathogenesis of both acne vulgaris and obesity is largely due to a relative deficiency of the same agent, pantothenic acid, a vitamin that is hitherto quite unknown to cause any deficiency syndromes in man. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that surprisingly large doses of pantothenic acid are required to overcome deficiency states as illustrated in the treatment of acne vulgaris and weight reduction. (Leung, 1997)
The hypothesis is that acne vulgaris may be closely related to the consumption of diets that are rich in fat content. Sex hormones are also involved, and the basic constituents or building blocks of the sex hormones are acetyl- CoA. For, aside from its role in the synthesis of the sex hormones, acetyl-CoA, of which coenzyme A is the important component, is also important in fatty acid metabolism as an acyl carrier in the lengthening and degradation of long chain fatty acids by adding or removing acyl groups in the metabolic process.

Pantethine, the stable disulfide form of pantetheine, is the major precursor of coenzyme A, which plays a central role in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates. Coenzyme A is a cofactor in over 70 enzymatic pathways, including fatty acid oxidation, carbohydrate metabolism, pyruvate degradation, amino acid catabolism, haem synthesis, acetylcholine synthesis, phase II detoxification, acetylation, etc. (Horváth and Vécsei, 2009)

 

Dr. Ron

 


Articles

 

Pantothenic acid as a weight-reducing agent: fasting without hunger, weakness and ketosis
            (Leung, 1995) Download
With the conventional method of fasting or aggressive dieting to reduce excess body fat, hunger, weakness, ketogenesis and ketosis are the sequential events that follow. It is not fully understood why, under conditions of negative calorie balance where complete energy release from storage fat is critical, ketosis should arise with a concomitant wastage of energy. Here, I wish to propose a theory that relates the formation of ketone bodies under such conditions to a deficiency in dietary pantothenic acid. Supplementation of this vitamin would facilitate complete catabolism of fatty acids and thus the formation of ketone bodies could be circumvented. As a result, a sufficient amount of energy would be released from storage fat to relieve dieters of the sensation of hunger and weakness which otherwise would be difficult to endure. Hence, using this method for weight reduction together with a careful observation of calorie intake, I have great success in treating overweight-to-obese patients to lose weight.

A stone that kills two birds: how pantothenic acid unveils the mysteries of acne vulgaris and obesity
            (Leung, 1997) Download
Acne vulgaris is the most common disease of the skin. Obesity is arguably the commonest of a clinical entities in the affluent society. The pathogenesis of these disorders is far from clear cut and they appear to have little in common. In the present paper it is hypothesized that the pathogenesis of both acne vulgaris and obesity is largely due to a relative deficiency of the same agent, pantothenic acid, a vitamin that is hitherto quite unknown to cause any deficiency syndromes in man. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that surprisingly large doses of pantothenic acid are required to overcome deficiency states as illustrated in the treatment of acne vulgaris and weight reduction.

References

Horváth, Z and L Vécsei (2009), ‘Current medical aspects of pantethine.’, Ideggyogy Sz, 62 (7-8), 220-29. PubMed: 19685700
Leung, L. H. (1995), ‘Pantothenic acid as a weight-reducing agent: fasting without hunger, weakness and ketosis’, Med Hypotheses, 44 (5), 403-5. PubMed: 8583972
Leung, LH (1997), ‘A stone that kills two birds: how pantothenic acid unveils the mysteries of acne vulgaris and obesity’, J Orthomolecular Medicine, 12 (2), 99-114. PubMed: